RECURRENT CENTRAL VENOUS RETINAL OCCLUSION, CLINICAL FEATURES AND TREATMENT OUTCOME

  • Jana Nivicka Kjaeva University Clinic for Eye Diseases, Skopje, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Natasa Trpevska Sekerinov University Clinic for Eye Diseases, Skopje, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Gazmend Mehmeti University Clinic for Eye Diseases, Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Andrijana Petrusevska University Clinic for Eye Diseases, Skopje, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia

Abstract

Occlusion, thrombosis of the central retinal vein is the second most common vascular disease after diabetic retinopathy. Retinal vein occlusion usually affects the older population. Hypertension, stroke, advanced age, sex, hyperlipidemia are all significant risk factors. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents have been shown to be effective in improving vision at this condition. Aim of this paper is to describe a 38-year-old woman with a medical history of hypertension who was complaining on blurred vision in the left eye. After a complete ophthalmological examination, she started with anti-VEGF treatment. After 3 monthly applications of aflibercept according to the T&E protocol, the treatment continued according to the PRN protocol, during which there was an exacerbation of the disease.


Keywords: central retinal vein occlusion, thrombosis, vascular, vascular endothelial growth factor, aflibercept.

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Published
2023-12-27
How to Cite
KJAEVA, Jana Nivicka et al. RECURRENT CENTRAL VENOUS RETINAL OCCLUSION, CLINICAL FEATURES AND TREATMENT OUTCOME. Journal of Morphological Sciences, [S.l.], v. 6, n. 3, p. 163-169, dec. 2023. ISSN 2545-4706. Available at: <https://jms.mk/jms/article/view/vol6no3-21>. Date accessed: 01 mar. 2024.
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Articles