INFORMED CONSENT IN GENETIC REASEARCH

  • Ljupco Chakar Institute of Forensic Medicine and Criminology, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Aleksandar Stankov Institute of Forensic Medicine and Criminology, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Goran Pavlovski Institute of Forensic Medicine and Criminology, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Natasha Bitoljanu Institute of Forensic Medicine and Criminology, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Viktorija Belakaposka Srpanova Institute of Forensic Medicine and Criminology, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Ana Ivcheva Institute of Forensic Medicine and Criminology, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Rosica Siamkouri Institute of Forensic Medicine and Criminology, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia
  • Zlatko Jakjovski Institute of Forensic Medicine and Criminology, Faculty of Medicine, Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, North Macedonia

Abstract

Recognizing the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of genetic testing becomes crucial for physicians in the face of complex medical issues, as they are increasingly expected to counsel their patients regarding the medical, psychological, and social responses arising from genetic information. Genetic medicine, with its extreme complexity and the potential repercussions on an individual's life, raises important questions in the ethical, deontological, and legal realms of medicine, playing a primary role in personalized medicine. The aim of this paper is to underscore the significance of informed consent and to provide insights into the ethical procedures associated with genetic testing.


Keywords: informed consent, genetic, genomic testing, ELSI


 

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Published
2023-12-27
How to Cite
CHAKAR, Ljupco et al. INFORMED CONSENT IN GENETIC REASEARCH. Journal of Morphological Sciences, [S.l.], v. 6, n. 3, p. 129-134, dec. 2023. ISSN 2545-4706. Available at: <https://jms.mk/jms/article/view/vol6no3-16>. Date accessed: 20 july 2024.
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Articles